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Understanding Kill

One of the first things people using a Unix machine learn is how to kill processes. Unfortunately, they usually learn the wrong thing, and use "kill -9" indiscriminately.



Title Last Comment
Murder and mayhem - killing users processes   2011/10/28 BigDumbDinosaur
- how to kill all of a specific user's user processes without "killall" - or select a subset to kill -

TASK_KILLABLE  
- Who hasn't been frustrated by some device stuck in a hardware read or write? Finally.. kill the unkillable. -

pkill  
- One some OSes, this is a 'parallel kill' that will use rsh to kill processes on multiple machines. On Linux and BSD, it allows selection by various criteria, including names (like 'killall'). -

skill  
- (Linux) A more user-friendly 'kill'. A bit more ease of use never hurts. This isn't all that friendly though. For example, while 'skill -iu fred' happily brings up each of fred's processes for you to kill or not, 'skill -i -u fred' just does nothing - -

Understanding Kill  
- One of the first things people using a Unix machine learn is how to kill processes. Unfortunately, they usually learn the wrong thing. -

kill -l on Solaris -->Re SunOS & SCO differencekill -l 132  
- The "kill" command is often a shell builtin, which can confuse people because it may work differently on different systems; -

(SCO Unix)What is a zombie process?   2011/11/15 TonyLawrence
- (SCO Unix) Why can't you kill a zombie process? One of the early things people learn about Unix is that a "kill -9" is invincible- that a process must die if you send it a KILL (-9). However, that's not entirely true -

(SCO Unix)When should I use kill -9?   2010/09/26 TonyLawrence
- (SCO Unix) The idea here is that properly written programs will respond to a -15 by cleaning up anything they need to do before dying. -

 
 
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