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Lazy DNS

I had a call this morning from a customer who wanted me to come down because their mail server was broken. They had experienced an ISP outage, which subsequently was fixed, but their mail server wasn't getting anything still. I was actually ready to go out the door when I thought to just double check reality, and that check kept me sitting right here:



Title Last Comment
Wrong DNS causes interesting glitch  
- An incorrect old DNS server in /etc/resolv.conf causes interesting behavior -

Lazy DNS  
- I had a call this morning from a customer who wanted me to come down because their mail server was broken. They had experienced an ISP outage, which subsequently was fixed, but their mail server wasn't getting anything still. I was actually ready to go out the door when I thought to just double check reality, and that check kept me sitting right here: -

DNS troubleshooting  
- DNS errors or misconfiguration causes all sorts of strange network behavior, including slow logins. -

Why you need a true secondary DNS server   2010/01/04 anonymous
- Some people may wonder why secondary MX records, or DNS servers are necessary, and until you have had an equipment failure, or outage, you might still be wondering. Most shared hosting out there will give you DNS servers (primary and secondary) since your registrar requires this. -

DNS problems at Network Solutions   2010/10/28 BigDumbDinosaur
- I had several people mention that they couldn't reach aplawrence.com yesterday -

dns: Tech Words the Day  
- Domain Name Service: how names like www.xyz.com are translated to ip addresses so that your packets and theirs can find one another. For many of us, DNS is simple. If we are using DHCP, we may get everything we need for DNS from the dhcp server. -

Dynamic DNS Services Update Scripts  
- In retrospect, it really does seem odd that I've never needed such a service before now, but so be it. -

Basic DNS: PTR records and why you care   2015/04/11 TonyLawrence
- A PTR record (sometimes called a "host PTR record") is what lets someone do a "reverse" DNS lookup - that is, they have your IP address and want to know what your host/domain is. -

PPP and DNS Configuration  
- This is an old article about SCO Unix PPP and is only left here for historical purposes. -

(SCO Unix)How to setup resolv.conf for DNS configuration   2010/05/24 alexB
- (SCO Unix) Reverse lookups (lookup name from ip) happen for every attempted connection. Edit the resolver file to get proper behavior and quicker connections. For Linux,that's /etc/host.conf; most other Unixes use /etc/resolv.conf -

samba dns resolv.conf -->Re Samba and DNS issues  
- For anyone that might be interested the answer is smb.conf: name resolve order = wins lmhosts bcast -

login slow dns setup -->Re Login prompt veryslow  
- login slow dns setup -->Re: Login prompt veryslow -

 
 











 
 















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