# # WordPress Plugin Development
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© February 2009 Anthony Lawrence

WordPress Plugin Development

  • Vladimir Prelovac
  • WordPress Plugin Development
  • PACKT Publishing
  • 9781847193599

I had my first look at WordPress plugins just last month. I mucked around with an existing plugin, looked at the php files on my system, scanned the gawd-awful WordPress documentation and was able to figure out quite a bit from that. I wasn't happy (did I mention the gawd-awful WordPress documentation?) but it was a beginning.

Let me be straight up on this: I'm NOT a big WordPress fan. Nobody would ever forget to include the word "mess" when searching for appropriate adjectives to describe WordPress. The use of Php has consistently opened up WordPress users to security problems and I have little doubt that it will leave them vulnerable once again. I would never, never, NEVER recommend this to anyone except..

Well, except that I do recommend it. Because it's simple for the non-techy user. Because the WordPress community does a decent job of keeping ahead of the Php security holes. Because although the whole plugin architecture is clumsy, limited and pretty dumb, it does make it easy for unsophisticated users to add features. And because WordPress is so damn popular in spite of its big warts, it's easy to find pre-made code and willing developers

How's that for a ringing endorsement?

With that out of the way, I knew I lacked the patience to muck through the WordPress supplied documentation if I wanted to learn more. This book seems just right for that. I was impressed that by the end of Chapter Two you would actually know a little more than I had scratched out of that sample code and a lot of painful time at the WordPress site. The examples used are practical - mundane enough to be easily understand, but requiring enough hooks to have you learn something useful.

I'm going to bang the "you need to be a programmer" drum again. Yeah, I know: most bloggers HATE that idea so much. It's true though. You are missing out on a lot by treating this stuff like brain surgery. Honest, honest honest: I'm an idiot! If I can do this stuff, so can you. This is no worse than learning how to pump your own gas - really!

And you'll never spill any Php on your shoes.

Tony Lawrence 2009-02-25 Rating: 4.0

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2 comments


Inexpensive and informative Apple related e-books:

Take Control of Parallels Desktop 12

Take Control of High Sierra

iOS 10: A Take Control Crash Course

Take Control of Apple Mail, Third Edition

El Capitan: A Take Control Crash Course





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Fri Feb 27 21:55:43 2009: 5536   MikeHostetler

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PHP the language is a horrid mess. PHP the platform is neat and does things that other platforms (Ruby on Rail, Django, etc. ) are envious of. For the curious, I think CakePHP is a pretty interesting project and works fairly well, for the few hours I mucked with it.

I recommend Wordpress for the same reasons above -- it's easy to use and easy to find web hosts for. The plugins are plentiful and now you can install them straight from the Admin interface. The themes are also good.



Mon Mar 23 09:11:02 2009: 5818   Vladimir

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Thanks for the review, I am really glad you liked the book.

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