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Burn Folders

A new feature in Tiger is "burn folders". In Finder, you'll see an option for "New Burn Folder", and that is useful if it's a bunch of disparate files you want to burn; copy them in there and click the "Burn" button.

I'd usually do burning from the command line so I can get a Windows readable CD (no longer necessary with Leopard), but sometimes I just need a Mac cd, so Burn Folders can be useful. However, I usually have a whole folder already to go, and there's really no reason to create a Burn Folder and copy stuff to it. Instead, just do this in Terminal:


 mv MyFolder MyFolder.fpbf
 
 

That's it. You've just turned "MyFolder" into a Burn Folder. You can't do this with Get Info in Finder, and that won't let you move a burn folder back to its ordinary name either, so you need Terminal or some other scripting. But why change it back? If you've burned it once, chances are you'll want to burn it again, so just leave it be.


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© Tony Lawrence







Tue Mar 11 21:01:02 2008: 3835   Nick


Thanks for the tip!

I came across this article while doing research for a script that would take a large number of files and populate burn folders with symbolic links to those files. The fun part is finding an arrangement that uses the least number of discs :)

Anyway, to populate your Burn Folder with a symbolic link, you can use this command:

ln -s pathToOriginalFile pathToNewLinkInBurnFolder

Thanks again!

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