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Zabasearch

If you know just a little bit about someone (the state they live in, approximate age) http://www.zabasearch.com can tell you more: town, street address, telephone number.

Perhaps more unsettling from some views is that Zabasearch also maintains publicly writable blogs: anyone who registers an email address with them can scribble whatever they like about anyone else. This really upsets some folks, but I think it's not as bad as it might seem. In the first place, there's a lot of old and conflicting information in the sources Zabasearch scans, and of course there are always a lot of people with similar names in the same geographic area, so it isn't always easy to make a direct hit on someone without having more clues beforehand. But even if you can zero in on a particular person, and you nastily add some disparaging or embarrassing comment, how many of the rest of us care? I think if we were looking in Zabasearch at all (it's not something I'd be using very often) and came across an inapproprate comment, we'd ignore it or suspect it was mistaken or otherwise inapplicable.

If someone has posted graffiti against your name, nothing stops you from posting yourself to claim your innocense or perhaps just to fill the space up with unrelated nonsense to kill the entire value of the blog.

This is the seamy side of the web, but I doubt there's much real danger.



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