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Google helps you with privacy now and after you are gone

Google has recently announced My Account, which is a page where you can control much of what happens when you interact with Google - even if you don't have a Google Account. You can tell Google that certain types of advertising are of no interest to you - for example, I killed off sports and several other categories. There's a privacy checkup that quickly shows you everything related to Google accounts. There's a lot more - it will take you some time to go through it all, but it is time well spent.

I enabled automatic email response if I haven't logged in for three months. That can be set as long as 18 months if you wish.

Auto response for inactive accounts

Should your account become inactive, you can have Google notify up to ten people and optionally give each one access to your Google data such as email and photos.

Google Account Managers

With or without that, you can have all your Google data deleted after your account timeout.

Of course, you can download your own data any time you want.

Keeping your personal information private and safe—and putting you in control

Control, protect, and secure your account, all in one place



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Much to the surprise of the builders of the first digital computers, programs written for them usually did not work. (Rodney Brooks)

Today’s computers are not even close to a 4-year-old human in their ability to see, talk, move, or use common sense. One reason, of course, is sheer computing power. It has been estimated that the information processing capacity of even the most powerful supercomputer is equal to the nervous system of a snail—a tiny fraction of the power available to the supercomputer inside [our] skull. (Steven Pinker)







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