Additional Info





When someone says: "I want a programming language in which I need only say what I wish done", give him a lollipop. (Alan J. Perlis)





This post tagged:



Share



./bashrc doesn't run automatically

Got questions? Go ahead: Ask me anything!



Author: dhart
Date: Fri Apr 8 13:27:02 2005


Subject: ./bashrc doesn't run automatically

On a Red Hat system:
Linux Allied-2 2.4.21-4.ELsmp #1 SMP Fri Oct 3 17:52:56 EDT 2003 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

my customer has played with webmin and did something to logins so that some users .bashrc doesn't get executed. Instead they find themselves at a $ prompt and if they type in ./.bashrc it runs fine.



-rwxr-xr-x 1 tom titan 168 Apr 7 15:27 .bashrc

I've compared ownership & permissions with users that work correctly, no joy.

Any Ideas?




(OLDER) <- More Stuff -> (NEWER)    (NEWEST)   

Printer Friendly Version

-> -> ./bashrc doesn't run automatically

4 comments




More Articles by © dhart







Fri Apr 8 13:38:05 2005: 301   TonyLawrence

gravatar
Well, for one, are you sure you understand what .bashrc is for?

Sounds to me like you are trying to use .bashrc for what .bash_profile should be used for. That's most definitely a path to disaster; see
(link)

The use of bashrc can be overridden by "--rcfile file" on startup - don't know if that's what webmin did do you, but you should NOT be using bashrc to start other programs: use .bash_profile or .profile.






Fri Apr 8 13:43:25 2005: 302   dhart


looks like .bashrc doesn't run if .bash_profile doesn't exist. go figure.



Fri Apr 8 13:51:00 2005: 303   TonyLawrence

gravatar
No, that's not really what's happening, but .bashrc is NOT for starting programs (unless it's something that you want to run everytime any other shell script runs).

Logging a user into an app should be done in .bash_profile, not .bashrc

From the man page:
 
       When  bash is invoked as an interactive login

shell, or as a non-inter- active shell with the
--login option, it first reads and executes com-
mands from the file /etc/profile, if that file
exists. After reading that file, it looks for
~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login, and ~/.profile,
in that order, and reads and executes commands
from the first one that exists and is readable.
The --noprofile option may be used when the
shell is started to inhibit this behavior.

When a login shell exits, bash reads and
executes commands from the file ~/.bash_logout,
if it exists.

When an interactive shell that is not a login shell
is started, bash reads and executes commands
from ~/.bashrc, if that file exists. This may be
inhibited by using the --norc option. The --rcfile
file option will force bash to read and
execute commands from file instead of ~/.bashrc.


So, yes, it won't run .bashrc without SOMETHING else to run, but again: it's purpose is NOT to start apps for users.. use .bash_profile for that.






Fri Apr 8 14:00:40 2005: 304   dhart


mmmm, yes, I see your point. The road to .bashrc is fraught with peril.

I had managed to avoid that trap by placing
exec /usr/local/bigbadshellscript in .bashrc.

Curious, then, that .bashrc is executable at all.


------------------------
Kerio Samepage


Have you tried Searching this site?

Unix/Linux/Mac OS X support by phone, email or on-site: Support Rates

This is a Unix/Linux resource website. It contains technical articles about Unix, Linux and general computing related subjects, opinion, news, help files, how-to's, tutorials and more.

Contact us