Jim Mohr's SCO Companion

Index

Copyright 1996-1998 by James Mohr. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the author.

Be sure to visit Jim's great Linux Tutorial web site at http://www.linux-tutorial.info/

Introduction to Operating Systems


It is a common occurrence to find users who are not even aware of what operating system they are running. On occasions, you also find an administrator who may know the name of the operating system, but nothing about the inner workings of it. For many, they have no time as the are often clerical workers or other personal who were reluctantly appointed the system administrator.

Being able to run an SCO system does not mean you have to understand the intricate details of how it functions internally. However, there are some operating system concepts that will help you not only interact better with the system, but also server as the foundation for many of the issues we're going to cover throughout this book.

In this chapter we are going to go through the basics of what makes an operating system. First we'll talk about what an operating system is and why it is important. We are also going to address how the different components of work and work together.

Because my goal is not to make you an expert on operating system concepts. Instead I want to provide you with a starting point from which we can go on to other topics. If you want to go into more details about operating systems I would suggest Modern Operating Systems by Andrew Tanenbaum, published by Prentice Hall and Operating System Concepts by Silberschatz, Peterson and Galvin, published by Addison Wesley.

Next: What is an operating system?

Next Chapter: Basics of SCO UNIX

Index

Copyright 1996-1998 by James Mohr. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the author.

Be sure to visit Jim's great Linux Tutorial web site at http://www.linux-tutorial.info/